The Story of Reading at St George's

The Story of Reading and Literacy at St George’s Catholic School, Taunton

 

EYFS

 

Little Wandle Phonics daily with catch up groups receiving twice daily input. Guided Reading linked to phonics through the week.

Read Write Inc Phonics from Year One . An established scheme in our school which has seen us achieve above national average scores in the phonics screen. 

 

Book Talk – once a week. Mixed ability groups to listen to a story and discuss/ look at vocabulary. 

Vocabulary books to be sent home for each child to pre-learn key vocabulary.

 

Storytime every day- books linked to topics or class stories. Pie Corbett Story Spine texts. 

 

Talking Partners with TA- intervention to support children with vocabulary/sentence structure.

 

EAL gps- intervention to pre-learn or consolidate work in class. Looking at vocabulary/re-reading stories.

 

Home Reading books- up to 3 books per week linked to phonics and guided reading or shared stories. 

 

Neli Intervention. 

 

 

Year 1

Read Write Inc Phonics daily with catch up groups receiving twice daily input. Guided Reading linked to phonics three times a week.

Setting up Shared Text  home readers.  Read a text in class and will have work set to do at home e.g learning story maps, comprehension, learning vocabulary etc. Reading response activities.

Story time daily . Can be linked to topics. Pie Corbett Story Spine. 

Literacy Shed Plus and Somerset Literacy Network Planning Flowcharts for planning and these plans are providing the basis for shared stories. Alan Peat Sentence Types. 

Talk for Writing Principles. 

Children have access to Bug Club on line.

Children have access to Big Cat readers on line which links to Little Wandle Phonics. 

Home Reading books- up to 3  books per week linked to phonics, guided reading and shared stories. 

Priority readers  have 1:1 attention.

Head Start Grammar . Deepening Understanding Grammar. Head Start Spelling from the Summer Term. 

 

Reading in Year Two.

 

Majority of children…

On Monday we pre-teach vocabulary for the new book. We then group read through the chapters and pick out words to add to our vocabulary lists.

Tuesday we re-cap the previous day’s text, predict what may happen next and then carry on through the book with a focus on vocabulary.

Wednesday we do a follow up piece of comprehension/activity about the book. This varies each week, but we copy the format of example questions from the SATs tests. These are sometimes closed word activities, match the sentences, true and false answers and full sentence responses.

We have Go Facts and Badger Guided Reading sets which can be ability matched and which come with teacher packs to guide questioning. Questions can be differentiated. 

Thursday we do a piece of comprehension from the HeadStart materials. The children read through the text independently and highlight words they are not sure about. We then got through it in small groups and talked about the words. They then peer mark when time allows.

Friday we do a spelling test from the HeadStart materials.

We have the Literacy and Language Scheme which we can use to read a variety of text types.

We sometimes use Twinkl resources for comprehension if they are appropriate and curriculum linked. Twinkl resources can be differentiated. 

We regularly order topic book boxes from Resources for Learning and use these for research and personal reading.

Mrs Farthing’s group (EAL, children who haven’t passed the phonics screening in year 1 and SEND) follow a similar approach. They have an extremely heavy approach with vocabulary and take the books more slowly. They also do a lot of teaching of phonic sounds during the Autumn Term and then recap for the rest of the year.

We have regular reading log checks. Up to 3 books a week are sent home. These will have been introduced in school. 

Class two has a star reader each week who has impressed us with a lovely reading log. That child gets the star reader chair and their picture gets put on the door. The Reading Logs encourage the children to read a variety of books.

Priority Readers -

We take individual readers out each week, mainly children who are not reading at home with an adult, or need extra support.

 

Reading in Class 3

 

In Class 3 we share a short text or a chapter of a book each week in a series of ‘guided reading’ sessions. 

The children look up vocabulary in dictionaries.  The vocabulary will have been carefully selected from the text and will include words/phrases they may not have come across before and is designed to broaden their vocabulary and help support their understanding of the text.

Throughout the week the teaching staff try to use the vocab in a range of contexts to develop their understanding of the words.

Later in the week the teacher will read the text aloud to the children and encourage them to summarise what they have read. The class will discuss what they enjoyed about the story/information, discuss inferences and make predictions about what may happen next.

Finally, the children will answer comprehension questions independently.

Alongside our guided reading sessions, I have a class reader which I try to read daily. This reader will come from our Pie Corbett Story Spine for progression and consistency or it may be topic linked for relevance. 

The children take home a reading scheme book which has been selected based on their current attainment level. The children are given the opportunity to change these books through the  week and this process is guided by an adult. During the book changing session, the children are heard to read by an adult. The Reading Logs encourage the children to read a variety of genres. We award Golden Tickets for regular readers. 

We have a class set of guided reading texts which we can use alongside Twinkl, Headstart and Deepening Understanding. These texts will offer breadth but may also be curriculum linked. 

Our class library is regularly tidied and sorted and our class TA selects recommended books for the children from the class library. 

Literacy and Language covers a variety of text types and the Anthologies allow the class to read quality texts across genres.

We have Headstart Comprehension materials that we can use and link to the curriculum. We use Deepening Understanding comprehension texts and questions and we try to link these to the curriculum. These materials can be differentiated. 

We sometimes use Twinkl resources for comprehension if they are appropriate and curriculum linked.

We regularly order topic book boxes from Resources for Learning and use these for research and personal reading.

I have a list of ‘priority readers’ who are heard to read by an adult on extra occasions during the week.

Children who need catch up phonic sessions use Little Wandle or RWI resources (depending on phonic history) to close the gap. 

We use Bug Club on line reading to set guided reading homework and as a way of allocating banded scheme books. This was a well used resource in Lockdown. We are about to start a new guided reading project where are guided reading books become our home reading books in an effort to close the gap and inspire confidence in our children especially those who may not be able to access home support. 

 

Reading in Class 4

In Class 4 I do a number of things to support reading…

We will read from a 'real'  book or we will find text extracts appropriate to the class and to topic. If a book is used , it can be ability matched. if a text extract is used, it can be differentiated as a text or through question setting. This session is designed to be ambitious so more complex texts would be used than the children could competently read alone. If a whole class text is used , differentiation will be through support and appropriate questioning. 

Guided Reading-

Day 1 Children are given a number of words which will appear in the text. They look up the definition of these words and they are displayed in the classroom. Children are encouraged to use these words throughout the week.

Day 2 I model a read aloud and then the children read the text which I try to link to my topics e.g. Water Cycle-Science, Longships - Vikings. The children summarise the text. 

Day 3 Children read the text and are shown the questions. Day 4 children answer the questions.

We have whole class reading books which we read on a regular basis and which link to topics. Children all have copies of the text and are encouraged to read. (Lollipop sticks)

We have a daily reader which will be from our Pie Corbett Story Spine or which might be curriculum linked. 

Priority readers are heard through the week. The most vulnerable readers get priority time with the teacher. 

Children who need catch up phonic sessions use Little Wandle or RWI resources (depending on phonic history) to close the gap. 

Children are guided to choose books from the Reading Scheme. Children are heard to read from a scheme book on a one to one basis each week. Reading Logs are checked weekly. In Class 4 we start to train children to make sensible independent book choices. We are just starting a guided reading project to close the gap for our least confident readers and for those not able to access support at home . 

When looking at genres of writing…we also identify features by reading different texts.

Bug Club allows access to a variety of text genres as does the school reading scheme, the Essential Fiction / Non-Fiction Anthologies and the Literacy and language Scheme.

We have Headstart Comprehension materials that we can use and link to the curriculum. We use Deepening Understanding and Twinkl comprehension texts and questions and we try to link these to the curriculum. these can all be differentiated. 

We have a class set of guided reading texts which we can use alongside Twinkl, Headstart and Deepening Understanding. These texts will offer breadth but may also be curriculum linked. 

The children have access to the school library each week. 

Reading Logs encourage children to read a breadth of genres. We celebrate home reading with our Golden Ticket initiative. 

Reading Logs are monitored on a weekly basis by in class teachers and by the Literacy Coordinator. 

We regularly order topic book boxes from Resources for Learning and use these for research and personal reading.

 

Reading in Class 5

 

Reading in Year 5 is linked to our curriculum. We choose a class reader, which is usually linked to our History, Geography or Literacy topic. For example, we read Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief when we studied Myths in Literacy and we read Stig of the Dump when we were learning about the Stone Age in History.

Our Guided Reading texts are also linked to the curriculum. For example, when we study the Tudors in History, we read Horrible Histories: Terrible Tudors and when we studied Eastern Europe in Geography, we read about the physical and human features of Europe and focused on building our vocabulary around trickier subject vocab words.

Our weekly Guided Reading follows the KS2 guidelines for Reading from our Reading Policy. The class teacher reads a whole class text early in the week. The children then read the text during Guided Reading to an adult and then complete vocabulary/word detective work, to ensure they understand the meaning of new vocabulary. Mid-week, the children summarize what they have read, either verbally to a response partner or as a written paragraph in their Guided Reading Books. Towards the end of the week, the children answer comprehension questions on the chapter/text and these are marked whole class so the children receive instant, quality feedback led by the class teacher.

Bug Club allows access to a variety of text genres as does the school reading scheme, the Essential Fiction / Non-Fiction Anthologies and the Literacy and language Scheme.

Reading Logs encourage children to read a breadth of genres.

There is a focus on the whole curriculum on vocabulary. We are word detectives, collecting powerful words for our writing in word banks in Literacy and looking up the meanings of new words regularly in other subjects. This is evident in children’s books.

We sometimes use Twinkl resources for comprehension if they are appropriate and curriculum linked.

We regularly order topic book boxes from Resources for Learning and use these for research and personal reading.

We have a class set of guided reading texts which we can use alongside Twinkl, Headstart and Deepening Understanding. These texts will offer breadth but may also be curriculum linked. 

We have Headstart Comprehension materials that we can use and link to the curriculum. We use Deepening Understanding comprehension texts and questions and we try to link these to the curriculum.

Children who need catch up phonic sessions use Little Wandle or RWI resources (depending on phonic history) to close the gap. 

 

Reading in Class 6

 

In Class 6, we share a short text or a chapter of a book each week in a series of ‘guided reading’ sessions.

Firstly,  the children look up vocabulary in dictionaries. The vocabulary has been carefully selected from the text and will include words/phrases they may not have come across before and is designed to broaden their vocabulary and help support their understanding of the text. Throughout the week the teaching staff try to use the vocab in a range of contexts to develop their understanding of the words.

Next, I read the text aloud to the children and encourage them to summarise what they have read. We discuss what we enjoyed about the story/information, discuss inferences and make predictions about what may happen next.

Following this,  the children answer comprehension questions independently.

Alongside our guided reading sessions, I have a class reader which I read at every given opportunity. The book will come from our Pie Corbett Reading Spine or will be linked to our writing and/or history topics.

The children take home a reading scheme book which has been selected based on their current attainment level. The children are given the opportunity to change these books through the week. They are guided in this process by an adult. We have banded books up to Black Level to ensure our most competent readers receive quality texts. I have  selection of well chosen texts in my class library that the children can choose from. 

Literacy and Language covers a variety of text types and the Anthologies allow the class to read quality texts across genres.We are trialling Read to Write as a scheme which could further integrate Reading into our curriculum . 

We have Headstart and Twinkl Comprehension materials that we can use and link to the curriculum. We use Deepening Understanding comprehension texts and questions and we try to link these to the curriculum. These texts and questions can be differentiated. 

We regularly order topic book boxes from Resources for Learning and use these for research and personal reading.

We check reading logs weekly to ensure children are reading at home. We hear each child read one to one at length and have an in depth reading interview with each child each term to ensure that children have ‘lability matched’ texts from the scheme.

Children visit the school library and are guided towards books by our librarians who tracks their free reading. Our librarians may also hear priority readers. Once a year the children complete a questionnaire on their library reading and in addition they receive a one to one interview about their library choices. The librarian uses these sources of information to stock the library and to guide children in book choices. The children have a list of recommended books for Year 6 that they can take to the library each week and they are challenged to read at least 10 of these over the year.

We have priority readers in class and these children will read one to one with a member of staff. These children are chosen on the basis of the regularity of home reading and assessment scores. 

Reading is at the heart of the curriculum and learning and we try to make reading the source of our learning whenever we can in class 6. We have embedded reading opportunities into our curriculum planning. 

The class has whole class shared texts such as Friend or Foe, Oliver Twist, A Little History of the World or poetry anthologies and plays. These can be read together and link to the curriculum.  

We have a class set of guided reading texts which we can use alongside Twinkl, Headstart and Deepening Understanding. These texts will offer breadth but may also be curriculum linked. 

The children are regularly set Bug Club reading homework which tests comprehension. The scheme texts can be ability matched. The teacher can mark and write answers back to the children. The children can read a range of genres which are often linked to the curriculum.  In school sessions are provided for those who cannot access the online reading at home. This is made freely available to Pupil Premium children and priority readers.

Children who need catch up phonic sessions use Little Wandle or RWI resources (depending on phonic history) to close the gap. 

These testimonials have been written by each class teacher. There is a reading file in each class teacher’s room which tracks priority readers and general class reading which further tells the story of reading across the school. These files are shared by class teachers and teaching assistants.

 

The Story of Reading from : The Literacy Coordinator

 

We are trying hard to promote ourselves as a reading school. We recently set up a school library. which has been catalogued using the Libresoft system. Children use this once a week during the school timetable and it is open in lunchtimes and on two evenings after school. It is run by librarians who track and monitor the children and who provide termly feedback on library reading to staff which is cross referenced with Reading Log and Bug Club scrutinies, feedback from one to one reading and reading assessment to build up an overview picture of our children as readers.

We have just extended our library space and we now have a purpose built library space on the field. 

I have given teaching staff two Staff Training meetings on the teaching of reading this year and we have recently agreed how we will teach Guided Reading. I have monitored this in books and it is going well.

We have a Little Wandle phonics programme in place in KS1 with catch up provision in Year 3  and Year 4 for those who do not pass the screening before they leave KS1. Children who enter the school who need a phonic catch up programme can receive this support in any year group. One to one intervention in phonics caan be given in any year group according to need. 

Progress in phonics is regularly monitored by Rachel Godfrey who feeds back to SLT on phonic progress and provision to meet need. Priority children are regularly identified and provision changed to maximise progress.

The reading scheme in KS 1 has recently been refreshed with the change from Read Write Inc to Little Wandle to ensure that texts match the phonetic stage of children. The phonics programme was changed in order to suit the needs of our cohort as we felt that the current scheme linked texts were not as well suited to the needs of our EAL pupils as Big Cat Collins texts which form the basis of the Little Wandle scheme. We were keen to foster a love of reading and the Little Wandle approach holds this high in its rationale.  Children will receive a phonetically decodable home reading book each week which they will have read in a guided reading session. Children also have access to texts which develop sight vocabulary as we have identified this to be an area of need for our pupils. Children will take home non decodable books that they have shared in class to foster a love of reading and to provide breath and interest to their reading diet to develop a love of reading. 

 We have recently provided staff with extensive training as a result of changing to Little Wandle. 

Children in both KS 1 ands 2 have access to Bug Club texts. The Read to Me function is particularly useful for EAL pupils.

We have a reading scheme in KS 2 which was heavily overhauled this year. This overhaul proves takes place very two years with new scheme books bought to cater for losses and need. We have invested in a Big Cat Progression set of books to provide a bridge between Key Stage One and Two for our least secure readers. 

We have invested in a Black Band box to keep our most competent readers reading from the scheme until they leave our school. 

Our Libresoft Library system catalogues books according to book bands so that children can be guided to appropriate texts for their ability in the library. 

Support staff have been given training sessions on how to use the scheme and advice has been given on how to hear children read through a training domain on GDocs. As the coordinator, I have monitored how support staff read with children and how book changes are managed in each class. I know that support staff are aware of priority readers.

Each class has a reading file where data on reading is kept so that all those in charge of reading with children can be made aware of levels and details to support reading.

We issue Golden Tickets for excellent Reading Log entries and give out termly prizes for great readers which are drawn in assemblies.

 

We take part in the SLN Poetry Slam and we have a poetry step in school wWe will be hosting a Poetry Slam in school this year.

We always celebrate World Book Day and World Read Aloud Day. We have had a Vocabulary Day and  Book Swap events. We  signed up to  the ‘Share a Million Stories’ challenge. Our Head Teacher enjoys reading aloud to children. We took part in the Hay Festival on line and we have signed up to the Ovid in the West Country competition in alliance with The University of Bristol. 

We host events to educate parents. We recently held a ‘Hot Chocolate: Read With Your Child’ event which was hosted by Sarah Cook. Sarah spoke to over 50 parents and gave advice on how to read with your child and how to foster a love of reading in the family. Parents then read with their child in the hall over a cup of hot chocolate.

 

We have sponsored reads and Readathons during Lent.

We take part in extreme reading competitions

We regularly have competitions in school to promote reading

We send out information on reading to parentsin many languages.

We have books in our library in many languages.

We are Resources for Learning Gold Subscribers and regularly hire out topic books.

We subscribe to First News and children can access the papers in the library.

There is a story club which meets in the library at playtimes.

There is a sharing shelf of books in the school foyer so people can help themselves to a good read while they are waiting in the foyer.

We a have a teachers’ book club which meets half termly and we are trying to connect parents to set up a parent book club.

We visit the town library and the town library visits us.

We invite in an author each year to inspire children to read.

We have Skype sessions with published authors.

We regularly tweet about reading to raise the profile of reading among our parents and followers.

We are a member of a hub group called –Taunton a Reading Town and we have just volunteered to take on the running of this club. We have a buddy reading school as a result of this project.

Year 6 have 'buddy reads' with secondary schools in the summer term to promote reading through the holidays. 

Teachers from receiving secondary schools come to school to teach reading lessons to set expectations and give out texts for the children to read over the summer in readiness for the first Literacy topics of Year 7. 

We celebrate Shakespeare Week in school. We host an annual Key Stage One Nativity Play , A Stations of the Cross play and a Year 6 play each year. 

We have recently rewritten our curriculum to put reading at the heart of our teaching. We have bought class sets of books which have been written into our plans so that our children can see the role that reading has to play in learning. We read to learn. We love to read.